Everything about Kubernetes, news, articles, tutorials...
21. A Crash Course For Running Istio (medium.com)
Published: Wednesday, 05 June 2019.
At Namely we’ve been running with Istio for a year now. Yes, that’s pretty much when it first came out. We had a major performance regression with a Kubernetes cluster, we wanted distributed tracing, and used Istio to bootstrap Jaeger to investigate. We immediately saw the potential of a service mesh as it relates to our infrastructure and decided to make an investment in the tool.
22. Kyma - extend and build on Kubernetes with ease (kubernetes.io)
Published: Friday, 24 May 2019.  By:Lukasz Gornicki (SAP)
According to this recently completed CNCF Survey, the adoption rate of Cloud Native technologies in production is growing rapidly. Kubernetes is at the heart of this technological revolution. Naturally, the growth of cloud native technologies has been accompanied by the growth of the ecosystem that surrounds it. Of course, the complexity of cloud native technologies have increased as well. Just google for the phrase “Kubernetes is hard”, and you’ll get plenty of articles that explain this complexity problem. The best thing about the CNCF community is that problems like this can be solved by smart people building new tools to enable Kubernetes users: Projects like Knative and its Build resource extension, for example, serve to reduce complexity across a range of scenarios. Even though increasing complexity might seem like the most important issue to tackle, it is not the only challenge you face when transitioning to Cloud Native.
23. A multi-cluster continuous delivery tool for Kubernetes (razee.io)
Published: Friday, 24 May 2019.  By:An IBM open source project
Automate the rollout process of Kubernetes resources across multiple clusters, environments, and cloud providers, and gain insight into what applications and versions run in your cluster.
24. Kubernetes 1.14: Production-level support for Windows Nodes, Kubectl Updates, Persistent Local Volumes GA (kubernetes.io)
Published: Friday, 05 April 2019.  By:Kubernetes Release Team
Kubernetes 1.14 consists of 31 enhancements: 10 moving to stable, 12 in beta, and 7 net new. The main themes of this release are extensibility and supporting more workloads on Kubernetes with three major features moving to general availability, and an important security feature moving to beta. More enhancements graduated to stable in this release than any prior Kubernetes release. This represents an important milestone for users and operators in terms of setting support expectations. In addition, there are notable Pod and RBAC enhancements in this release, which are discussed in the “additional notable features” section below.
25. Kubernetes v1.14 delivers production-level support for Windows nodes and Windows containers (kubernetes.io)
Published: Friday, 05 April 2019.  By:Michael Michael (VMware), Patrick Lang (Microsoft)
The first release of Kubernetes in 2019 brings a highly anticipated feature - production-level support for Windows workloads. Up until now Windows node support in Kubernetes has been in beta, allowing many users to experiment and see the value of Kubernetes for Windows containers. While in beta, developers in the Kubernetes community and Windows Server team worked together to improve the container runtime, build a continuous testing process, and complete features needed for a good user experience. Kubernetes now officially supports adding Windows nodes as worker nodes and scheduling Windows containers, enabling a vast ecosystem of Windows applications to leverage the power of our platform.
26. Kubernetes 1.14: Local Persistent Volumes GA (kubernetes.io)
Published: Friday, 05 April 2019.  By:Michelle Au (Google), Matt Schallert (Uber), Celina Ward (Uber)
The Local Persistent Volumes feature has been promoted to GA in Kubernetes 1.14. It was first introduced as alpha in Kubernetes 1.7, and then beta in Kubernetes 1.10. The GA milestone indicates that Kubernetes users may depend on the feature and its API for production use. GA features are protected by the Kubernetes deprecation policy.
27. Orchestration of Apps with Data with Kubernetes and Kmesh (blog.calsoftinc.com)
Published: Tuesday, 26 March 2019.  By:Sagar Nangare / Calsoft Inc.
The technology world is looking for flexible IT infrastructure that will easily evolve to meet changing data and performance requirements in support of the onslaught of upcoming and lucrative use cases. Kmesh addresses data management and data sovereignty concerns while decreasing costs associated with storage and network resources.
28. Lightweight Kubernetes (k3s.io)
Published: Thursday, 28 February 2019.
Lightweight Kubernetes Easy to install. A binary of less than 40 MB. Only 512 MB of RAM required to run.
29. Debugging Ruby processes in Kubernetes (kirshatrov.com)
Published: Friday, 01 February 2019.  By:Kir Shatrov
Debugging non-containerized apps in production is dead easy: ssh to a host, rbspy, strace or gdb the process or run rails console to reproduce something in production.
30. Can Kubernetes Keep a Secret? (blog.solutotlv.com)
Published: Thursday, 31 January 2019.  By:Soluto Engineering Blog
A summary of the existing tools today for secret management on Kubernetes platform. The post focused on tools that integrate well with GitOps flow, and featuring a new tool that we built at Soluto
31. Dynamic secrets on Kubernetes pods using Vault (medium.com)
Published: Wednesday, 23 January 2019.
32. Kubernetes Failure Stories (srcco.de)
Published: Tuesday, 22 January 2019.
33. Kubernetes for Serverless Edge Platform - Edgility (blog.calsoftinc.com)
Published: Monday, 21 January 2019.  By:Sagar Nangare / Calsoft Inc.
How Kubernetes is used to orchestrate workloads in serverless edge platform development by AT & T - Edgility
34. Using S3 As a Helm Repository (hackernoon.com)
Published: Sunday, 13 January 2019.
35. Kubernetes Authorization via Open Policy Agent (itnext.io)
Published: Sunday, 13 January 2019.
In a best-practice Kubernetes cluster every request to the Kubernetes APIServer is authenticated and authorized. Authorization is usually implemented by the RBAC authorization module. But there are alternatives and this blog post explains how to implement advanced authorization policies via Open Policy Agent (OPA) by leveraging the Webhook authorization module.
37. The Art of the Helm Chart: Patterns from the Official Kubernetes Charts (hackernoon.com)
Published: Friday, 11 January 2019.  By:Ryan Dawson
Learn from the best by taking a deep dive into how the official kubernetes charts solve common problems.
38. Tips for Getting Started with Helm (hackernoon.com)
Published: Thursday, 13 December 2018.  By:Ryan Dawson
You’ve got an application that you want to deploy with Helm but you're feeling disoriented and aren't sure how to get started? Follow these tips and you'll soon be making waves.
39. Production-Ready Kubernetes Cluster Creation with kubeadm (kubernetes.io)
Published: Thursday, 06 December 2018.  By:Authors: Lucas Käldström (CNCF Ambassador) and Luc Perkins (CNCF Developer Advocate)
kubeadm is a tool that enables Kubernetes administrators to quickly and easily bootstrap minimum viable clusters that are fully compliant with Certified Kubernetes guidelines. It’s been under active development by SIG Cluster Lifecycle since 2016 and we’re excited to announce that it has now graduated from beta to stable and generally available (GA)!
40. Kubernetes 1.13: Simplified Cluster Management with Kubeadm, Container Storage Interface (CSI), and CoreDNS as Default DNS are Now Generally Available (kubernetes.io)
Published: Thursday, 06 December 2018.
We’re pleased to announce the delivery of Kubernetes 1.13, our fourth and final release of 2018! Kubernetes 1.13 has been one of the shortest releases to date at 10 weeks. This release continues to focus on stability and extensibility of Kubernetes with three major features graduating to general availability this cycle in the areas of Storage and Cluster Lifecycle. Notable features graduating in this release include: simplified cluster management with kubeadm, Container Storage Interface (CSI), and CoreDNS as the default DNS.
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